Poisonous and Dangerous Plants

November 18, 2010
By

By Jean Hofve, DVM

Aconite (Monkshood, Wolfsbane)

Agaricus Mushrooms

Aloe 1

Amanita Mushrooms

Amaryllis

Avocado (leaves, seeds)

Azalea

Baneberry

Black Walnut

Bleeding Heart

Bouncing Bet (Soapwort)

Bulbs (Lily, Daffodil, Tulip, Iris, Hyacinth, Amaryllis, Cyclamen, etc.)

Caladium

Catnip 2

Castor Bean (seeds)

Celandine

Cherries (Black Cherry, Bitter Cherry, Choke Cherry, Pin Cherry)

Christmas Rose

Clovers

Cocklebur

Coffee Tree ( Kentucky Mahogany, American Coffee Bean Tree, Nicker Tree)

Comfrey

Common Burdock

Cow Cockle

Curly Vetch

Creeping Charlie

Daffodil

Daphne

Death Camas

Delphinium

Dogbane

Doll’s-eyes

Dumbcane (Diffenbachia spp.)

Easter Lily

English Ivy

Ergot

Fireweed (Summer Cypress, Burning Bush)

Foxglove

Foxtail Barley

Garlic 3

Golden Chain (Laburnum)

Great Lobelia (Cardinal Flower, Indian Tobacco)

Ground Ivy (Creeping Charlie, Gill-over-the-Ground

Groundsels

Hemp (Cannabis spp.)

Henbane

Holly Berry

Horse Chestnut

Hyacinth

Hydrangea

Irises

Japanese Pieris

Japanese Yew

Jerusalem Cherry

Jessamine

Jimsonweed (Stinkweed, Thornapple, Mad Apple, Devil’s Trumpet, Angel’s Trumpet; Datura spp.)

Johnsongrass

Latana (Red Sage, Yellow Sage, West Indian Latana)

Larkspurs

Lily

Lily-of-the-Valley

Lupine (Bluebonnet)

Marijuana

Marsh Marigold (Cowslip)

Mayapple (Mandrake)

Mexican Poppy

Milkweed

Mistletoe

Monkshood

Narcissus

Nightshade (Black Nightshade, Deadly Nightshade)

Oak Trees

Oleander

Onions and Chives

Panther

Peace Lily (Spathiphyllum)

Philodendron

Pink Lady’s Slipper

Poison Hemlock, Water Hemlock

Poison Ivy

Poison Oak

Poison Sumac

Poinsettia

Pokeweed

Poppies

Potato (green, sprouts)

Pothos

Privet (berries)

Purple Mint

Red Maple

Redroot (Pigweed, Carelessweed)

Rhododendron

Rhubarb

Rosary Pea

Scarlet Pimpernel

Snow-on-the-Mountain

Spurges (Euphorbia spp.)

Stinging Nettle

Sweet Pea (Tangier Pea, Everlasting Pea, Caley Pea and Singletary Pea)

Tansy

Thorn Apple (Jimsonweed)

Tobacco (Tree Tobacco)

Tulips

Tung Oil Tree

Umbrella Tree

Virginia Creeper

Water Hemlock (Cowbane)

Wisteria

Yew


This list was compiled by Little Big Cat from sources at Cornell University, University of Illinois, University of Pennsylvania, the Canadian Poison Plants Information System, and Purdue University.

1. Aloe leaves contain latex, which can be irritating to the colon and may cause diarrhea.

2. Not all cats are responsive to catnip, and not all cats respond favorably. Some cats become aggressive on catnip. Never give your cat catnip before a visit to the veterinarian or other stressful event!

3. A member of the onion family, garlic can cause hemolytic anemia if consumed in large amounts.

6 Responses to Poisonous and Dangerous Plants

  1. KathinUK on May 18, 2013 at 5:12 am

    Ok then, so whats the issue with mistletoe for kitties? I see its included [25%] in Dorwest Herbs Organic Valerian Compound I’ve recently bought.

    DH is a reputable company in uk … or so I thought :-0

    Kath

    • jhofve77 on May 18, 2013 at 11:25 am

      Being reputable doesn’t mean they know anything about herbs! I work with a company that had a herbalist who formulated several formulas that included lobelia, which is mildly toxic. I love lobelia in my garden, but I’m removing it from all of their formulas.

      Mistletoe is being used in humans for some types of cancer. Here is what I wrote about it in my first book, Holistic Cat Care:
      “The mistletoe plant itself is highly toxic; however, there are preparations or extracts that are thought to stimulate the immune system, kill cancer cells, and help reduce tumor size. It is typically used in conjunction with surgery, chemotherapy, and/or radiation because it may help minimize side effects of these radical treatments. Mistletoe herbal extracts are available, but due to potential toxicity don’t use them without close veterinary supervision.”

      Raw mistletoe should not be given to cats. Here is more info on its toxicity:

      Mistletoe (Phoradendron flavescens)
      Family: Viscaceae
      ASPCA Poison Control Center
      Mistletoe Toxicity:
      Toxic to Horses, Toxic to Cats, Toxic to Dogs
      Toxic Principles:
      Toxalbumin, pharatoxin viscumin (Lectins, Phoratoxins)
      Clinical Signs:
      Gastrointestinal disorders, cardiovascular collapse, dyspnea, bradycardia, erratic behavior, (hallucinogenic in humans). Vomiting, diarrhea, low blood pressure (rare).

      http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/002883.htm

  2. Sue Winters on November 17, 2011 at 12:57 pm

    My cat has IBD – would aloe vera juice help?? I see the plant leaves are bad but what about the juice inside?
    thank you so much!!

    • jhofve77 on November 17, 2011 at 3:44 pm

      Aloe leaves contain latex, which can be irritating to the colon and may cause diarrhea.

  3. Diane on October 12, 2011 at 8:00 am

    Is it okay to give garlic in small amounts? I see it in pet supplements and in recipes published in books (I think Kymythy Schultz was one of them) and wonder, because I’ve also read that it’s toxic in cats, so I don’t understand why it’s included. Does garlic build up in the system over time or is the body able to eliminate it? Thank you!

    • jhofve77 on October 12, 2011 at 8:32 am

      Garlic breaks down red blood cells; more garlic = more damaged cells. A small amount of whole garlic may be okay; garlic powder should not be used. I don’t recommend Kymythy’s recipes for cats, though it’s wonderful for dogs. Personally, I avoid it. I think the pet foods and supplements with garlic believe the amounts are small enough, but my philosophy is “why take a chance”?

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